Category Archives: Interview

Interview: Gary Dubin (His acting career & voicing Talouse in The Aristocats)

Actor Gary Dubin
Actor Gary Dubin

Actor Gary Dubin began his acting career at the age of six, and went on to appear in numerous movies and television series, including a recurring role as Punky Lazaar in “The Partridge Family,” and voicing the character of kitten Talouse in the 1970 Disney animated feature “The Aristocats” (More photos below)

Gary appears in an episode of Adam 12
Gary appears in an episode of Adam 12
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Close-up of Gary in Adam 12
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Gary recording the voice of Talouse in The Aristocats
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Gary Dubin in an episode of The Paper Chase

AUDIO INDEX

:56 How Gary got started in acting at the age of six; Some of the films he appeared in, including his recurring role as Punky Lazaar in “The Partridge Family”

3:47 Auditioning for The Aristocats in 1969 at the age of 10; Being on the Disney lot; Preparing for and recording the songs

5:43 Spending time in studio schools as a child actor

6:15 Getting recognized for his work

Interview: Harriet Burns (Babes in Toyland/Mary Poppins)

Walt Disney and Harriet Burns study a bird
Walt Disney and Harriet Burns study a bird

Harriet Burns worked on some of Disney’s most classic movies, television shows and theme parks, having started on the earliest days of Disneyland and retiring after working on Walt Disney World and Tokyo Disneyland. Harriet often worked on props for Disney movies such as “Babes in Toyland” and “Mary  Poppins.” Primarily a scenic designer/model maker, Harriet ended up involved in much more than what her job typically entailed,  and often appeared on television with Walt Disney.  (See more photos below)

AUDIO INDEX

1:16 Working on “Babes in Toyland”; Working on the big cake for the “Babes in Toyland” cast party, which was a televised as an episode of “Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color” entitled “Backstage Party”; performing the goose puppet for Mother Goose in the movie and television show

4:26 Working on the robin for the “Spoonful of Sugar” scene in “Mary Poppins”; Obtaining a robin skin from 1893 from the Natural History Museum for authenticity – trading it for Disneyland tickets; Julie Andrews wore a ring that went from the robin to the controls of the mechanical bird; Walt Disney liked to “show off” the bird

Harriet burns sits behind Walt Disney in the "Backstage Party" episode of "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color"
Harriet burns sits behind Walt Disney on the set of the “Babes in Toyland” movie, for the “Backstage Party” episode of “Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color”
Mary McCarty appears as Mother Goose as Harriet operates her goose puppet for the close-up camera shots
Mary McCarty appears as Mother Goose as Harriet operates her goose puppet for the close-up camera shots

Interview: Jack Gladish (Creating Jungle Cruise animals)

Jack Gladish, working on "Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln" for the World's Fair
Jack Gladish, working on “Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln” for the World’s Fair

Jack Gladish started his Disney career as a precision camera machinist, working on classic animated films, and he later became an engineer working on attractions for Disneyland and Disney’s exhibits at the 1964 New York World’s Fair and eventually for the Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World. Some of the projects Jack was involved with throughout the years include Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln, the Carousel of Progress, Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room, the Jungle Cruise, Adventure Thru Inner Space and much more.

AUDIO INDEX
1:11 The process for creating the Jungle Cruise animals, particularly an elephant; Creating a master mold; How to cure the animals in an oven; Creating the vinyl skins and ensuring they won’t wear from rubbing against the fiberglass shell

Interview: Jay Meyer (Haunted Mansion ghost/Golden Horseshoe performer)

Jay Meyer in Disneyland's Golden Horseshoe
Jay Meyer in Disneyland’s Golden Horseshoe

As a singer, Jay Meyer has appeared in countless performances on television, movies and stage. He was a regular singer with the Ray Conniff singers, in the “Top Twenty” choir on the Tennessee Ernie Ford television show, and with the Sportsmen Quartet in the Phil Silvers and Alice Faye show and the Jack Benny show, first on radio, then on television. Jay sang in the chorus on such movies as “Mary Poppins,” “The Sound of Music,” “Annie get your Gun,” “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad,Mad World” and “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.” He’s appeared in concerts at the Hollywood Bowl with people such as Sammy Davis Jr. and Ray Charles, and in radio and television commercials for companies such as Post cereals, Mattel, Knotts Berry Farm and was seen singing “You Deserve a Break Today” for McDonalds. Jay is also seen and heard as a singing statue in the Disney “Haunted Mansion” attractions around the world. For fourteen years, Jay also appeared live in Disneyland entertaining audiences with Irish tunes in the historical Golden Horseshoe Revue.

HEAR JAY’S INTERVIEW:


SEE JAY IN VARIOUS PERFORMANCES:

ENJOY THESE PHOTOS:

Jay Meyer with a photo of his image in the "Haunted Mansion"
Jay Meyer with a photo of his image in the “Haunted Mansion”
Jay Meyer as a bust in Disney's Haunted Mansion attraction
Jay Meyer as a singing statue in Disney’s Haunted Mansion attraction
Jay Meyer (top) with the Sportsmen Quartet
Jay Meyer (top) with the Sportsmen Quartet
Jay Meyer in a performance of Disneyland's Golden Horseshoe Revue
Jay Meyer in a performance of Disneyland’s Golden Horseshoe Revue

AUDIO INDEX
1:19 Jay sings “It’s a Great Day for the Irish”

1:30 Jay’s start as a singer; Played trumpet and was the sole cheerleader at school; Jay joined the Marine Corps; Performed in the Marines

4:37 Jay moved to Los Angeles; Sang with Spike Jones, when Jones’ singer wife was pregnant; Joined the Jack Benny show as part of the Sportsmen
Quartet, including the Lucky Strike commercials

5:47 Jay sings one of the Lucky Strike songs plus clips of the original Lucky Strike commercials

8:29 Working on the Jack Benny Show and the Phil Harris/Alice Faye show; Went to New York and did Summer Stock; His wife, Tommy Meyer was a writer; Came back to California and did films and television

11:14 Jay was called to become a singing statue in the Haunted Mansion; Also did the Golden Horseshoe Revue as Fulton Burley’s substitute; Agreed to do the Horseshoe for six weeks in 1972 and stayed for 14 years

13:20 Jay sings “Too Ra Loo Ral” in a Golden Horseshoe Revue performance at Disneyland

 

Interview: Don Dorsey (Career in Disney Audio)

Don Dorsey and Sadie Mae, the band organ heard in America on Parade (1976)
Don Dorsey and Sadie Mae, the band organ heard in America on Parade (1976)

Enjoy these Electrical Parade facts and other Disney entertainment history!

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Don Dorsey is a musician, director, producer, and audio engineer whose work for Disney includes everything from musical performances and arrangements to sound design to complete show design and direction for several Disney parks.

Don started his long-lasting relationship with Disney in 1975 and for the first 17 years served as the main audio recording and post-production engineer for the Entertainment Division of the Disneyland Park.

With the opening of Epcot in 1982, Don began creating and directing nighttime spectaculars for the World Showcase Lagoon beginning with A New World Fantasy and moving on to Laserphonic Fantasy, IllumiNations, and most recently Reflections of Earth. Other nighttime shows created and directed by Don include “Sorcery in the Sky” for Disney Studios Florida, and “Starlight Magic” for Tokyo Disneyland.

As of 2015, Don is in his 41st year of consulting to Disney and works mostly behind the scenes coordinating sound and music for Creative Entertainment at the Disneyland Resort.

I sat down with Don in 2009 to find out more about the creation of “Reflections of Earth.” I hope you enjoy hearing his interview! And don’t miss the photos below.  As always, I’ve also included the Audio Index below. (Transcription available here)

Don Dorsey with his E-MU Synth (1977)
Don Dorsey with his E-MU Synth (1977)
Don Dorsey and his Minimoog (1972)
Don Dorsey and his Minimoog (1972)
Don Dorsey recording "tap dancing" sounds for America on Parade soundtrack (1975)
Don Dorsey recording “tap dancing” sounds for America on Parade soundtrack (1975)
Bob Jani stands on Main Street in Disneyland to hear the America on Parade soundtrack mix (1975)
Bob Jani stands on Main Street in Disneyland to hear the America on Parade soundtrack mix (1975)
Recording the Electrical Water Pageant at Jack Wagner's home studio (1977)
Recording the Electrical Water Pageant at Jack Wagner’s home studio (1977)

 

AUDIO INDEX

1:36 Jack Wagner, the “voice of Disneyland,” and audio producer, and Don’s mentor; Bob Jani, the vice president of entertainment at Disneyland and Walt Disney World, creator of the Main Street Electrical Parade, Electrical Water Pageant and America on Parade among others

2:42 America on Parade, one of Disney’s largest parades, produced for America’s bicentennial; the Sherman Brothers’ song “The Glorious Fourth” was the overture for America on Parade; Sadie Mae, the band organ used for the America on Parade soundtrack

3:48 Don’s musical beginnings

8:12 Meeting Jack Wagner, and getting a one time for Disneyland; Being rediscovered by Jack Wagner while performing on his synthesizer for a concert; Being asked to do synthesizer work on the America on Parade soundtrack and performing banjo and various sound effects in Jack’s home dining room studio

13:33 The unique soundtrack of America on Parade, deemed “the Great American Music Box” by Bob Jani and the music of the Sadie Mae band organ; recording “The Glorious Fourth” parade overture

19:04 Following America on Parade, going to Florida and becoming Jack Wagner’s assistant; Working with Jack at his house each day; A funny Bob Jani memory when Bob gets cherry pie on his white suit

22:38 Learning from Jack Wagner

24:50 The Electrical Water Pageant; the E-MU synthesizer; the Main Street Electrical Parade returns after a hiatus during America on Parade; Don creates new music for the Electrical Parade; the beginning of Disneyland parade introductions – the opening window; the opening fanfare for the Main Street Electrical Parade

28:33 Updates to the Main Street Electrical Parade, including soundtrack and more dimensional units and new units; the parade became more efficient in terms of battery power and less cables; the history of the closing music of the Electrical Parade, which originated at the Orange Bowl halftime show in 1978; how Battlestar Gallactica inspired the original introduction dialogue sound

Interview: Larry Billman (Pioneer of Disney live entertainment)

Larry Billman wrote and/or director hundreds of Disney live productions worldwide
Larry Billman wrote and/or director hundreds of Disney live productions worldwide

Larry Billman began his career as a performer on stage, screen and television before becoming a Writer/Director of Disney Resort live entertainment worldwide. For over 40 years he was involved in the production of hundreds of live shows at Disneyland, Walt Disney World, Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea. Among those shows, Larry wrote the Hoop de Doo Revue, one of the longest running dinner shows in American history. That show debuted in 1974, and as of 2016, the show continues to delight audiences at the Fort Wilderness Resort in Walt Disney World. A few of his other credits include  the Disney Character Director of Disney on Ice, Director of Entertainment at Tokyo Disneyland and Tokyo DisneySea, and VP of Entertainment at Walt Disney World, to name a few. (See more photos and Audio Index below)

 

Larry Billman, (top left) with the cast of the Disneyland version of the Mickey Mouse Club, which led to the 1977 revised television edition
Larry Billman, (top left) with the cast of the Disneyland version of the Mickey Mouse Club, which led to the 1977 revised television edition

 

Larry Billman, as he appeared in the 1963 Disney movie, "Miracle of the White Stallions"
Larry Billman, as he appeared in the 1963 Disney movie, “Miracle of the White Stallions”
Larry Billman (left) and John Anello (right) working on the unique "Fun with Music" educational Disneyland show
Larry Billman (left) and John Anello (right) working on the unique “Fun with Music” educational Disneyland show

AUDIO INDEX

2:14 Larry Billman appeared in the 1963 Disney film “Miracle of the White Stallions”

6:13 After being a choreographer on the traveling Disney on Parade, Larry was hired by Bob Jani at Disneyland Entertainment; More on the history the 1969 Disney on Parade; Larry was assigned to work with the circus performers; Working with circus legend Barbette; A Disney on Parade mishap with a dancer

14:56 Became a writer/director for a Disneyland revue in Tomorrowland, originally called “See America First,” which included original Mouseketeer Sherry Alberoni and Teri Garr. Music was written by Tom Adair and Paul Suter; The show’s title was changed to “Show Me America”; “Show Me America” was updated for Walt Disney World

20:26 Big name stars returned to Disneyland after “Show Me America” and Larry Billman and Barnette Ricci developed an opening number called “The Great American Music Machine” which featured a giant jukebox; There was later an opening with a pinball machine and later another show called “The Great Rock Circus”

23:20 Disneyland director of entertainment Bob Jani’s philosophy on Disneyland parades

25:30 The little-known “Fun with Music” educational show at Disneyland

26:47 Wrote and directed the All American College Singers shows which led to writing the Hoop de Doo Revue; The college program was supposed to run for six weeks

30:04 Bob Jani wanted Mickey Mouse Club-style kids at Disneyland; The Mickey Mouse Club stage show at Disneyland which led to the 1977 television version; The performers from the new television version performed at Disneyland

33:16 Japan Airlines worked with Disney to do a show called “Come to America” to encourage Japanese people to visit America, particularly Disneyland; The 1978 show toured to audiences of as many as 3,000; Did a second Japan Airlines tour in 1981 to announce the upcoming Tokyo Disneyland; Moved to Japan until 1985 and was the creative producer

35:40 Returning to America Larry’s job at Disney was not waiting for him; Prior to being in Japan, Larry worked with Irvin and Kenneth Feld on Disney on Ice; A little bit about Irvin; Larry helped shape Disney on Ice as it is today, rather than just having ice skaters and then a Disney act; Approached Kenneth about doing the Circus Fantasy marketing promotion at Disneyland; Larry went to work for Kenneth Feld on Ringling Bros./Barnum & Bailey circus, writing many of the shows

39:29 Invited to work on Tokyo DisneySea, what Larry enjoyed the most, working with Walt Disney Imagineering on the design of the park; Became the director of entertainment for Tokyo DisneySea

Interview: X Atencio (Working in animation and writing for Disneyland and Disney World)

X Atencio with a replica of the Jolly Roger that he provides the voice for and wrote the dialogue for
X Atencio with a replica of the Jolly Roger that he provides the voice for and wrote the dialogue for

X Atencio began his Disney career in 1938 in animation, working as an assistant animator on “Pinocchio.” He went on to write dialogue for attractions such as the Haunted Mansion, Pirates of the Caribbean, Submarine Voyage in Disneyland and El Rio del Tiempo in Epcot, among others. X also wrote songs for many of the attractions he worked on including “Grim Grinning Ghosts” for the Haunted Mansion and “Yo Ho (A Pirates Life for Me)” for Pirates of the Caribbean. (Also, see more photos below.)

 

X Atencio stands by the tombstone tribute to him that used to reside outside the Haunted Mansion in Disneyland, but is now in his home backyard
X Atencio stands by the tombstone tribute to him that used to reside outside the Haunted Mansion in Disneyland, but is now in his home backyard
Disneyland vice president Norm Doerges, a boy from the audience, Pirates designers Marc Davis and X Atencio for the 25th anniversary of the Pirates of the Caribbean attraction in 1992
Disneyland vice president Norm Doerges, a boy from the audience, Pirates designers Marc Davis and X Atencio for the 25th anniversary of the Pirates of the Caribbean attraction in 1992

AUDIO INDEX
3:30 X’s start in Disney animation; attended Chouinard Art Institute; got a job at Disney in 1938 as an assistant animation to Woolie Reitherman, working on the Monstro scenes for “Pinocchio;” Worked on “Bongo” and then was drafted and went into the Signal Corps

14:01 Returning to the Disney Studios; Worked with Wooly Reitherman again, as an assistant animator on various shorts; did story sketch, storyboards on films; Working with Bill Justice on the “I’m No Fool” animated series of shorts, featuring Jiminy Cricket; Worked with Ward Kimball on the “pointy nose character” films, including the Academy Award-winning “Toot, Whistle, Plunk and Boom”

16:51 Returning to work with Bill Justice working on stop-motion films such as “Noah’s Ark,” and a “Symposium on Popular Songs” and opening titles for films like “The Parent Trap” and “The Shaggy Dog” and the “Spoonful of Sugar” nursery scene in “Mary Poppins”; About stop-motion animation, a very tedious job

19:12 Working on the never-completed animated short on doodles with storyman Larry Clemmons; Called into Walt’s office to move over to WED (now known as Walt Disney Imagineering); Worked in the model shop with Claude Coats on the Primeval World diorama for the Disneyland Railroad;

21:29 Was asked by Walt to write the script for “Pirates of the Caribbean”; Walt had an uncanny ability to find talent in people; Worked on the auction scene first, and read books and the “Treasure Island” film to get inspiration for the pirate jargon

23:20 Becoming the voice of the Jolly Roger talking skull and crossbones; Also had a line in the auction scene on the bridge saying “Six bottles of rum!”; Writing “Yo Ho (A Pirates Life For Me)”; People perceiving graphic lyrics in the song; Used a thesaurus to come up with lyrics

26:55 Writing for rides is different than a fixed audience; Writing the script for Submarine Voyage attraction; The Haunted Mansion lobby dialogue; No storyline in the attractions, stories didn’t lend themselves to rides; The raven in the “Haunted Mansion” was going to be the original attraction narrator; X is heard in the spiel when the “Haunted Mansion” ride stops and in the coffin saying “Let me out of here?”

31:01 Adding Captain Jack Sparrow to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” attraction and other changes; Translating the dialogue for Tokyo Disneyland

33:45 Writing the dialogue and song for El Rio del Tiempo in Epcot, “It’s Fun to Be Free” for World of Motion in Epcot, and “If You Had Wings” for the Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World

35:57 Remembering the day Walt Disney died, the type of person Walt was, and the first time X met Walt

Interview: Stan Jolley (Art director of Disneyland, Disney films and TV)

Stan Jolley at his "Ichpa-Mayapan," which means "exclusive estate"
Stan Jolley at his “Ichpa-Mayapan,” which means “exclusive estate”

Stan Jolley was a Hollywood producer, director, art director, production designer who had a lot to do not only with Disney, but with the very beginnings of Disneyland! His Disney film work included everything from “Zorro” to “Old Yeller” to “Elfego Baco” and “Toby Tyler.” He was the art director of the Academy-Award nominated animated featurette “Donald in Mathmagic Land.”

His large list of non-Disney movie credits include “Caddyshack,” “Witness” and “Superman” and television credits include “Mr. Ed,” “MacGyver” and “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.” As the art director for the pilot episode of “Get Smart,” Stan designed the classic title sequence with the doors and phone booth, as well as iconic props such as the “cone of silence.”

In 2009, for my Mouse Clubhouse, Stan invited me to photograph his 22,000 square foot estate. It is part home, part museum. Beyond every corner was not only a part of either Hollywood or Disney history, but with remarkable views in every room. In fact most rooms had at least one mirror in it so that you’d be able to see the gorgeous surrounding scenery no matter what direction you are facing.

Please enjoy the photographic tour below of the home of Stan Jolley and be sure to listen to the audio of that is beneath some of the photos.

This clapboard is from one of the films that Stan directed, "Today's FBI"
This clapboard is from one of the films that Stan directed, “Today’s FBI”
The 7.7 million dollar estate was built and designed in the early '70s by Modernist Howard Lapham for socialite-sportswoman Maxine Cook. An admirer of Frank Lloyd Wright, Lapham focused on blending ancient Maya and modern design.
The 7.7 million dollar estate was built and designed in the early ’70s by Modernist Howard Lapham for socialite-sportswoman Maxine Cook. An admirer of Frank Lloyd Wright, Lapham focused on blending ancient Maya and modern design.

 

This view is the entrance of Stan's house
This view is the entrance of Stan’s house
This pathway which leads to the front door features beautifully aligned stonework columns. From this angle, it seemed like a perfect residence for the man who was the art director of Donald in Mathmagic Land. Just look at all the geometric shapes that can be recognized from this one angle! At the left, on the other side of the greenery is a tennis court nestled into the surrounding mountain scenery.
This pathway which leads to the front door features beautifully aligned stonework columns. From this angle, it seemed like a perfect residence for the man who was the art director of Donald in Mathmagic Land. Just look at all the geometric shapes that can be recognized from this one angle! At the left, on the other side of the greenery is a tennis court nestled into the surrounding mountain scenery.
Mayan calendar carved out of redwood
Mayan calendar carved out of redwood. Be sure to listen to the audio of Stan describing this artwork and the front doors to his house as pictured below.
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The front doors are 14 feet high, four inches thick, weigh 400 pounds apiece and are carved out of redwood
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The arrowhead-shaped pool offers a stunning view overlooking the Coachella Valley
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Stan sits on his couch, surrounded by the mountains. He would often bring a blanket outside and sleep on the couch to enjoy all the natural beauty
Stan stands beside a beautiful portrait of Natalie Wood as she appeared in the movie "Gypsy." Listen to the audio below for a fun story about it.
Stan stands beside a beautiful portrait of Natalie Wood as she appeared in the movie “Gypsy.” Listen to the audio below for a fun story about it.

 

Stan admires artwork from his friend, legendary Disney artist Herb Ryman. Be sure to listen to the audio below of Stan's start with Disney, thanks to Herb.
Stan admires artwork from his friend, legendary Disney artist Herb Ryman. Be sure to listen to the audio below of Stan’s start with Disney, thanks to Herb.
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Concept art of Tomorrowland for the opening of Disneyland
artwork reads "Restaurant between Main Street & True Life Adventure Land"
Concept art for what would become the Plaza Pavilion for the opening of Disneyland. Note the artwork reads “Restaurant between Main Street & True Life Adventure Land”
Concept art of Frontierland for the opening of Disneyland shows the "World's Longest Little Bar" next to the Golden Horseshoe. The Mile Long Bar would open in Bear Country in Disneyland in 1972, with mirrors on each side of the bar interior for the illusion of length
Concept art of Frontierland for the opening of Disneyland shows the “World’s Longest Little Bar” next to the Golden Horseshoe. The Mile Long Bar would open in Bear Country in Disneyland in 1972, with mirrors on each side of the bar interior for the illusion of length
Concept art of a South Western Street in Frontierland for the opening of Disneyland
Concept art of a South Western Street in Frontierland for the opening of Disneyland
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Stan had this and the following two images created to potentially adorn Donald Duck’s “office” in an episode of Walt Disney’s Wonderful of Color. Stan added various captions to each just for fun.

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Photos of Stan on the sets of various movies he worked on decorated one of his rooms, including this image. Henry Fonda (left), Stan Jolley (middle), and Fred MacMurray (right) on the set of the “The Swarm,” 1978
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This piece of original concept art for Disney’s “Elfego Baca” was created under the guidance of Stan, who was the art director.
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Construction on the $125,000 permanent Western Street took over three months to complete, and was the combined plans of three of Disney’s art directors, Stan Jolley, Marvin Davis, and Carroll Clark.
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As Stan’s caption reads, this was the “first shot of filming the new Western Street built for Elfego Baca.” Since Stan was the art director for the show, he was there on the set, seen at the bottom left of the photo. Later, when he was the art director of the feature film Toby Tyler, he was the first one to modify the street.
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Stan converted his six garages at the house into art galleries!
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This former garage featured props and artwork with a western theme, and images of Stan’s father, I. Stanford Jolley, who was a character actor, primarily in westerns, for over 43 years.
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This collage features Stan’s dad in many of his film roles. In 1948, the Milwaukee Journal wrote that “I. Stanford Jolley, veteran villain, has died 77 times in 109 movies by 40 different and ingenious methods.” He went on to appear in nearly 400 different films and television shows.
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This artwork was given to Stan for his birthday. It was drawn by legendary Disney artist T. Hee, accompanied by the signatures of many of Disney’s artists (image below). Marc Davis, Dick Humer, Ward Kimball, Bill Peet and Ken Anderson were amongst the group. Yes, the happy names T.Hee, Huemer and Jolley were all working together.

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Stan’s 1955 “Disneyland, Inc.” ID
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Cast & crew party for Zorro with art director Marvin Davis, actor Henry Calvin, Stan and actor Armor Goetten
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Stan with Robert Loggia, star of Elfego Baca
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Here is a Martian Wheat Field concept for Tomorrowland in Disneyland
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Concept art for Tomorrowland in Disneyland, this Metallic Screen Mural would feature fused colored plastic and special night lighting effects.
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Concept for the entrance to Tomorrowland in Disneyland, the rocket would actually be a giant sundial!
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Interestingly, this Disneyland Tomorrowland Entrance concept art is quite similar to Innoventions in the “new Tomorrowland” of 1998.
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This Disneyland concept artwork features the Tomorrowland entrance as it would appear with the iconic “Clock of the World.”
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Stan worked with Fred Joerger and Wathel Rogers of the Disney model shop, to develop the Storybook Land canal attraction. When the attraction first opened, there was no miniature scenery or buildings as there is now. In this image, they are determining the best scale and location for the new scenes.
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Stan stands with a cut out of Snow White’s cottage to determine the best scaling for the miniature building that still appears in the Storybook Land attraction.
Stan's ticket to the opening of Disneyland on July 17, 1955. Click below to hear why Stan did not attend the grand opening
Stan’s ticket to the opening of Disneyland on July 17, 1955. Click below to hear why Stan did not attend the grand opening
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This is the only photo Stan had on display of him with Walt Disney. Stan added his caption of what the conversation might have sounded like.

Interview: Lee Fugal (Disneyland’s “Golden Horseshoe Revue” entertainer)

Lee Fugal in the same 1965 Mustang he drove each day to Disneyland
Lee Fugal in the same 1965 Mustang he drove each day to Disneyland

Lee Fugal was the preshow entertainment for Disneyland’s historical “Golden Horseshoe Revue. ” He would play the piano, banjo, trumpet and trombone and even play some of those simultaneously. You can see Lee in action at his website athttp://www.leefugal.com (See more photos below.)

AUDIO INDEX
1:27 Lee’s start at Disneyland; Driving to California and used trumpet and trombone oil to fix the car; His Disneyland audition playing “Mary Poppins” music in 1965; Played banjo
3:10 Performing as the preshow for Disneyland’s “Golden Horseshoe Revue,” and then sitting in with the band for the show; Staying after a two-week trial; Tommy Walker, Disneyland’s director of entertainment
5:08 Lee’s preshow act, playing piano, two and three trumpets at once, banjo; About Wally Boag, Fulton Burley and Betty Taylor; Lee’s final performance festivities; The “Golden Horseshoe Revue” band Vince Rossi (piano), Sam Conti (trumpet) and Jerry King (drums); The “Calypso” sandwich at the Golden Horseshoe and Pepsi Cola; The singing waitresses
13:21 Performing for and meeting Liberace; Playing trumpet for Al Hirt; Mishaps during the show including when the power went out inside the Horseshoe
17:37 Lee playing the banjo in “Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color” in an episode entitled “Disneyland Around the Seasons”

Lee Fugal in front of Disneyland's Golden Horseshoe
Lee Fugal in front of Disneyland’s Golden Horseshoe
Lee Fugal on banjo
Lee Fugal on banjo
Lee Fugal with the Gonzalez Trio at Disneyland (Roberto, Carmelita, Lee and Arturo)
Lee Fugal with the Gonzalez Trio at Disneyland
(Roberto, Carmelita, Lee and Arturo)

Don’t forget to visit Lee’s website www.leefugal.com!

Interview: Jack Lindquist (Opening of Disney World and more)

1994 Disney Legends Ceremony, after putting his handprints in cement
1994 Disney Legends Ceremony, after putting his handprints in cement

Jack Lindquist was involved in the opening of Walt Disney World, but he started as Disneyland’s first advertising manager, beginning in 1955. He continued with the company in marketing for Disneyland. Walt Disney World and international Disney resorts. His many accomplishments include the creation of the Disneyland Ambassador program, the creation of the Walt Disney Travel Company, the international waters ceremony for the opening of the it’s a small world attraction, Disney Dollars, and in 1990 Jack became the first president of Disneyland.

THE OPENING OF WALT DISNEY WORLD

AUDIO INDEX
1:34 The start of World Showcase at Epcot; Traveling around the world for World Showcase, meeting people like Imelda Marcos and the Shah of Iran
3:44 The opening of Walt Disney World; Contemporary Resort did not have landscaping yet; People did whatever it took – at Disney it didn’t matter if it was their job or not
5:22 “Opening a theme park is like an invasion”; Disney is a great “dangling carrot” – there’s always something else to sign on for
6:26 Jack’s work philosophies, never took the company or the job too seriously because the core of the business is making people happy… if you can’t have fun how can your guests have fun?